J Korean Ophthalmol Soc > Volume 56(7); 2015 > Article
Journal of the Korean Ophthalmological Society 2015;56(7):1096-1103.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3341/jkos.2015.56.7.1096    Published online July 15, 2015.
The Effect of Caffeinated Energy Drink Consumption on Intraocular Pressure in Young Adults.
Seung Hwan Jo, Chang Kyu Lee
Department of Ophthalmology, Maryknoll Medical Center, Busan, Korea. Coolguy-2@daum.net
젊은 연령층에서의 에너지 음료 섭취와 안압과의 상관관계
조승환⋅이창규
메리놀병원 안과
Received: 23 August 2014   • Revised: 10 February 2015   • Accepted: 26 May 2015
Abstract
PURPOSE
Several energy drinks containing a high content of caffeine are widely consumed among young adults. We examined the effects of caffeinated energy drinks on intraocular pressure (IOP) and blood pressure (BP) in healthy young subjects. METHODS: In this prospective randomized, case-controlled cross over study conducted, from August to September of 2014, 40 healthy young volunteers (80 eyes) in their 20's and 30's drank 2 types of beverage each consumed after a 3-month washout period. The study participants were randomly given the caffeinated energy drink (group I, n = 20) or caffeine-free drink (group II, n = 20), IOP and BP were measured at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes and 12 and 24 hours after beverage consumption. RESULTS: In group I, the mean +/- standard deviation (SD) of IOP at baseline was 13.2 +/- 1.56 mm Hg and the IOP increased until 24 hours after drink consumption. IOPs at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes and 12 and 24 hours after drinking caffeinated energy drink were 14.45 +/- 2.12, 14.93 +/- 2.02, 14.85 +/- 1.55, 14.2 +/- 1.34, 14.25 +/- 1.74, and 13.35 +/- 1.61, respectively and statistically significant at 30, 60, 90, 120 minutes and 12 hours (p < 0.05). A corresponding increase in BP after drinking the caffeinated energy drink was observed but without statistical significance. Drinking the caffeine-free beverage did not affect IOP or BP significantly. CONCLUSIONS: IOP increases after consuming the caffeinated energy drink were statistically significant at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes and 12 hours. Therefore, caffeinated energy drinks may not be recommended for glaucoma patients or glaucoma suspects.
Key Words: Caffeinated drink;Caffeine;Energy drink;Intraocular pressure


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